CNN suggests 10 dishes visitors should try in Vietnam (P2)

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CNN suggests 10 dishes visitors should try in Vietnam
CNN suggests 10 dishes visitors should try in Vietnam

>>CNN suggests 10 dishes visitors should try in Vietnam (P1)

Bun bo nam bo

This bowl of vermicelli noodles — widely popular in Hanoi — comes sans broth, keeping the ingredients from becoming sodden and the various textures intact.

Bun bo nam bo
Bun bo nam bo

The tender slices of beef mingle with crunchy peanuts and bean sprouts, and are flavored with fresh herbs, crisp dried shallots, and a splash of fish sauce and fiery chili pepper.

Cao lau

One of Vietnam’s most popular dishes, cao lau combines elements from various cultures.

This pork noodle dish from Hoi An is a bit like the various cultures that visited the trading port at its prime.

Cao lau
Cao lau

The thicker noodles are similar to Japanese udon, the crispy won-ton crackers and pork are a Chinese touch, while the broth and herbs are clearly Vietnamese.

Authentic cau lao is made only with water drawn from the local Ba Le well.

>>More about Vietnam cuisine

Ca phe trung in Vietnam

Vietnamese “egg coffee” is technically a drink but we prefer to put it in the dessert category.

Ca phe trung in Vietnam
Ca phe trung in Vietnam

The creamy soft, meringue-like egg white foam perched on the dense Vietnamese coffee will have even those who don’t normally crave a cup of joe licking their spoons with delight.

In Hanoi, follow the tiny alley between the kitschy souvenir shops at 11 Hang Gai into the clearing, and up several flights of increasingly dicey stairs to pair your ca phe trung with an unbeatable view of Hoan Kiem Lake.

Xoi

Savory sticky rice is less of an accompaniment to meals in Vietnam, more a meal itself.

Xoi
Xoi

The glutinous staple comes with any number of mix-ins (from slithers of chicken, or pork to fried or preserved eggs), but almost always with a scattering of dried shallots on top.

Bun cha

Pho might be Vietnam’s most famous dish but bun cha is the top choice when it comes to lunchtime in the capital.

Just look for the clouds of meaty smoke after 11 a.m. when street-side restaurants start grilling up small patties of seasoned pork and slices of marinated pork belly over a charcoal fire.

Bun cha
Bun cha

Once they’re charred and crispy the morsels are served with a large bowl of a fish sauce-heavy broth, a basket of herbs and a helping of rice noodles.

Bun cha sets often come with the delicious nem cua be — fried crab spring rolls. Still not convinced? It’s what Obama ate during his night out with Bourdain.